About The Helyar Arms East Coker

About

Patrick and Claire are resident landlords of The Helyar Arms and are welcoming and friendly. Both of them have roots in the Home Counties, but feel their home is the West Country with both of them having family living nearby in Somerset and Dorset.

Patrick ran pubs when he was younger and Claire has been in the hospitality business for many years and when The Helyar Arms became available they jumped at the opportunity to become part of this quintessential village community.

 

Our Refurbishment

Throughout the non-structural refurbishment we have been very sympathetic to the original features that were covered up with the 1977 ‘modernisation’. We have decorated throughout the interior with a grey and cream colour scheme, that lifts the space whilst retaining that feeling of warmth and comfort that this beautiful building deserves.

We have installed a large wood-burning stove in the main bar area and a smaller one in the Apple Loft to enhance the warm and friendly atmosphere.

The Apple Loft has been transformed and the vaulted ceiling beams have been highlighted in a deep grey with dark straw walls. We have chosen some lovely curtains for the bar and blinds for the Apple Loft, using Drapes Direct in Martock who provided a first class service.

Together, the bar area and Apple Loft can accommodate up to 85 diners.

Outside has been painted with ‘Dove Grey’ on the walls and a lovely dark grey on the woodwork, and the garden is getting a facelift too, thanks to James Patten.

 

About Our Pub

The Helyar Arms dates back to the C15, possibly earlier, and its name was adopted after the death of the last of the East Coker Helyar family, Dorothy Heneage, in 1947. It was previously known as The New Inn and was owned by and mainly served the Coker Court Estate. The skittle alley is housed in an old building at the rear of the pub in the car park, which was converted from an old granary and stables in 1934.

With a large sunny garden to sit in during the summer months and a car park that can accommodate over 30 cars, we think The Helyar Arms is well worth a visit.

 

Our Dogs

About The Helyar Arms - Molly and GracieOur beloved chocolate coloured working Cocker Spaniel Molly is 6 years old. She had a litter of puppies early in 2016, to a wonderfully lineaged sire called Murphy. Sadly, things didn’t go to plan and we lost 5 out of the 6 puppies she was carrying. Happily, a beautiful puppy bitch with a gorgeous ginger coloured coat did survive and is now bouncing around terrorising her mother, and our ankles, with razor sharp needle like teeth. We named her “Gracie” and occasionally Dis-Gracie when she’s in a mischievous mood!

 

About Our Food

About The Helyar Arms - about our foodUsing local farmers and suppliers where-ever possible, we take great pride in offering a menu of both pub favourites and fine dining dishes. Our food is seasonal resulting in a menu that changes often. We also cater for those with allergies – Just ask before you order.

 

About East Coker

East Coker is a large village made up of several hamlets, dating back to Norman times rich in fine architecture and mellow stone thatch cottages. Standing on a hill overlooking the village is the church of St Michael, which was believed to have been built by Hugh de Courteney in 1276, who owned Coker Court. Coker Court is an historic building with its noble hall complete with minstrel gallery and magnificent Jacobean fireplace. Now split up into several residences, the house was once owned by the Archdeacon Helyar who had been chaplain to Queen Elizabeth I and in 1640 he built 12 almshouses at the entrance to the court and church. Within the churchyard lie the remains of the poet T.S. Eliot who once wrote a poem about East Coker. In the north of the village there are three important houses. Hymerford House, a C12 manor house, where the explorer William Dampier was born, North Coker House which was built in 1877 for George Troyte-Chafyn-Grove or ‘the old squire’ as he was known and Naish Priory, a beautiful old building believed to date to Tudor times.

The Helyar Arms Hanging BasketsThe Helyar Arms Bar